Benefits of Exercise on Body, Mind, and Career

The team at amge+ knows first hand the benefits of exercise with Mark and his athletics background, personal kettle bell training class of 20+ each week, and multiple 10km plus runs per week. Leeza is a trained dancer and Susan is passionate about Yoga. Andrew enjoys playing football and going to the gym – and we all can’t live without it. Firstly because we enjoy it, secondly, because we know our mind and body need it.

Recent studies show that vigorous exercise can increase longevity, even in patients who are obese or have heart disease or diabetes. Incorporating vigorous exercise - the kind that makes you sweat, get red in the face, and breathe hard - in just 30 per cent of your weekly workouts can help you live up to 13 percent longer. More immediate benefits of exercise include reduced depression and anxiety, increased energy, and oxygenation of the brain, which promotes new brain cell growth.

Aside from helping you maintain your weight, physical exercise helps you prevent heart disease by keeping blood pressure at a healthy level and lowering “bad” LDL cholesterol while raising “good” HDL cholesterol. The Heart Foundation of Australia recommends 30 minutes a day of exercise to promote heart health. Regular exercise can also protect against diabetes and some types of cancer.

The cognitive and physical effects of exercise can have a positive impact in your career, according to the Harvard Business Review. These benefits, which include improved concentration, sharper memory, faster learning, and enhanced creativity, can have serious implications for workplace performance. Further research shows that exercising during the workday can help you manage your time more effectively, be more productive, and feel more satisfied at the end of the day. These findings suggest that instead of viewing exercise as something that takes us away from work, it should be something we plan for and build into our day. Finding just 20 minutes to exercise can boost your mood for hours afterward - just make sure to schedule that workout early enough in the day, as exercising too late in the day can make it hard for you to fall asleep.

If you’re worried about fitting exercise into your busy schedule, try scheduling it like you would any other meeting - when mapping out your weekly schedule, make sure you include plans to work out. If you’re extra tight on time, you can try turning everyday activities into exercise - take the stairs instead of the elevator, or park your car further away to build some walking into your commute. There are even some exercises you can do right at your desk. Setting realistic goals and enlisting others to help can keep you from getting discouraged. Most importantly, remember to have fun - above all, exercise should be enjoyable.